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. europe has also been a blend of red and green as the ft names ecb chief the person of the year. we're going to kick off with breaking news. for that would, we go to david faber. >> news on best buy, in the news yesterday. the stock up sharply. what we can tell you right now is the board of directors of best buy, and its founder, richard schultz, has been trying to put together a group to essentially buy the company in a go private transaction, have extended the deadline in which he would need to come with a bid for best buy and created a window in fact that will begin on february 1st next year and end with the end of that month on february the 28th. giving schultz the opportunity to look at not just christmas sales, but the end of their fiscal year, which will end at best buy on the 31st of january. and that window, again, will be 28 days long giving him an opportunity to continue to try to cobble together a bid with private equity firms and those who might finance a potential bid for the company at whatever price that might come at, if it were in fact to come at all. no word in te
morning. all right. coming up new at 10, germany's chancellor angela merkel says europe will have to work very hard to it maintain its current standard of living. at the top of the hour, find out what she's saying about welfare and here is another development from overseas. we brought you the story last week, french actor gerard depardu, he is leaving home, leaving france because of higher taxes and handed in his passport. now, the french prime minister has some choice words for mr. depardu. he's obviously in the happy with him and find out exactly what he said at ten o'clock eastern time this morning. time is money. 30 seconds, here is what else we've got for you, an in japan, again, a landslide win, so, what's the new prime minister going to do about the world's worst debt problem? print more money and stimulate more, too. build more infrastructure. will that work? we have our own resident japan expert. question, is jeff immelt's cozy relationship with the president costing general electric shareholders money? we will be discussing it. and i lost on friday when i questioned "the washing
. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting national borders in europe, in africa, in india, and elsewhere. it leveled thousands of towns and villages in europe. killed or maimed more than a million soldiers and civilians, and bankrupted a dozen nations including england and france. remember, it started in britain's north american colonies, and the british government and british people naturally thought british subjects in british north america should share the costs of the war with their fellow citizens in britain. in fact, the government raised property taxes so high in britain that farmers rioted in protest and demanded that americans pay their fair share of the war. in 17 # 64, the british government extended to the colonies a stamp tax that everyone in britain had been paying for more than 70 years. it amounted to next to nothing for the average citizen, a pepny or two or a stamp attached to legal documents, publications, and the packages of non-essential products like playing cards. the harshest effects of this tax, however, were on members of three powerful special in
century, beginning of the 14th century, venice is one of the biggest cities in europe, one of the biggest and richest and that's kind of remarkable because if you've ever been there, it's such a crummy place. rd, mosquito bitten, lagoons, very hard to build are the only reason italians ended up babies because they chased them off the good land. so yours is incredibly rich, incredibly powerful state, sending its trade mission to china, controlling creeks, lands along the croatian coast, controlling my inspiring to the italian and land. how did they do it? to the nations of this fabulous right we can still taste today, where the liquor in her to probably the most innovative and economic system at that time. they have a particular form of contract system, which allowed. unusually if you were a person willing to take on risk. even if you didn't have capital, you could share in a deal with the partner who did have capital: a trading nation in the guy who didn't have capital, but he raced his life took a share of the profits. this really was the reason you have this huge market title vicar and
of the things that has happened since 1989 is the region called eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries will longer have anything in common with each other except for the common memory of communist occupation. >> more with anne applebaum, tonight at 8:00 on a "q&a." >> "washington journal" continues. host: for the latest in the so- called fiscal cliff negotiations, we are joined by stand from -- stanley collender, and we also have josh gordon. thanks to you as well. stan, you were on last week and we ask you for the percentages. you put the chance of a fiscal cliff getting done at. this week? -- gettguest: i think there is o chance other than new year's day, and even that might be overstating it a little bit. right now i am seeing a 75% chance that they will go over the cliff. host: joshua, what odds would you give? caller: i have no idea. i would say that it could be 50 -- guest: i have no idea. i would say. the thing that americans and the public should worry about is whether they get something done soon. there is a chance that by inauguration day, something will be d
is for our nation unexplored and unperilous territory. europe is experiencing that and the results are not attractive. it seems that when a majority of people internalize the big bang theory and ask with peggy lee is that all there is, when many people decide the universe is the result of a cosmic sneeze with no meaning, when they conclude that therefore life should be filled, overflowing with distractions, comforts and entertainments to assuage the board m, then they may become susceptible to the excitements of politics that promise assets meaning and spurs alleviations of a human condition berefts and therefore barren. we know from bitter experience of blood soaked 20th century the political consequences of this if it's meaninglessness. political nature of who are vacuum and a vacuum of meaning is filled by secular fighting faiths. fascism gave its adherence a meaningful life. communism taught it's adherence to derive meaning from the participation in the drama of history's unfolding destiny. the political paradox is this, secularism advanced in part as moral revolution against
the difference between the u.s. and europe has produced almost no innovation. we produce almost all of it. we pulled their growth rate up because of the success in the united states. >> eliot: jeff i'll get to you in ten seconds. if taxes were 100%, people would theoretically sit at home. when we're talking about a rise from 35% to 39% -- >> they sit at home in europe. >> eliot:, here we have a database to say what has happened when we move them marginally from 35% to 39.6%. they were created when the rates were at 39.6%. i don't see the causation. >> i think your viewers have to be very aware of the nature of these academic studies. there have been leading economists who have looked at this inside and out. the congressional research service, i believe was asked by the republicans to take that down. they cannot find a correlation between higher tax rates and slower economic growth. just let me finish, okay? clinton raised the tax -- people like feldstein and barro to do the arithmetic will undermine economic growth, be pre
, the meeting at the white house, 3:00 between the president and some congressional leaders. as for europe, getting some data out of japan overnight and some data out of europe. currently red arrows across the board, in london, paris, and frankfort. our road map begins at the white house. congressional leaders set to meet with the president, 3:00 p.m. this afternoon. senator reid has already said hopes of a deal are fading quickly. just two trading days left until the cliff. and it's not just the fiscal cliff. wind farms and dairy are set to get hit. >> the ports of the east coast and gulf coast are bracing for a potential strike. the potential for this, midnight sunday with a shutdown threatening to threaten 20% of the cargo traffic. >> and instagram feeling the sting of the flap around privacy with users, fleeing the site. how will this impact facebook? >> as we mentioned, dennis berman, "wall street journal" market place editor is joining us here on set once again for the next hour. good to have you back, dennis. lots to talk about between the cliff and other news. >> three days before
that as a problem states are operating as individual countries. when you go to europe, you know, the size is around the same but you see each state size is a country in europe. we are operating like a country. each state if colorado wants marijuana then they goat et it. if florida wants to have guns. was i was growing up i noticed that the federal government stepped in more. the lawmakers were accountable. if you went too mar in yofar in state the federal government slapped you back a little bit. when president obama came into arizona he got a stern talking to. and he's a chief of the country and he has a finger in his face. we have to have the respect for our leaders. the best that we can do is get t the stand your ground laurie peeled. that is why we want to repeal that. >> lucia and ron and your lawyer, john phillips. thank you for coming here and telling the story. i'm very, very sorry that you are sitting here tonight telling the story that you have to tell. thank you. we'll be back. you won't take my life. you won't take our future. aids affects us all. even babies. chevron is working to stop
of war. two decades ago, with all eyes on europe, the united states prematurely celebrated victory over communism and an end to the cold war but in 1989, the same year the berlin wall fell, tanks roll spood tiananmen square crushing in a bloody massacre the hopes of the chinese people. while communism was gone in europe it was revitalized in the world's largest nation. pyongyang's missile launch awakens us to a fact that communism still casts a long shadow over asia. the nuclear proliveuation threaten not only our allies in the pacific but our own people as well. in asia the cold war never ended an the united states and south korean forces stand guard together on this last frontier. attempts to engage pyongyang over the past four years have been met with repeated prove cage. the kidnapping of two american journalists, repeated missile launches, one more nuclear test, the sinking of a south korean naval vessel with the loss of 46 lives and the shelling of a south korean island. how much more should we endure before we say enough is enough? sweet talking pyongyang only seems to inspire fu
all over europe. >> yeah, right. >> if she's looking for her next destination, where should she go in europe? >> by train. that's what you do. >> you can sleep on it it's your hotel room for the night. >> it is but by december 31st book this deal. you get a global pass on eurail and it gives you access to 23 separate countries. you can sleep through all of them. >> you don't have to sleep through the country, but on your way to the country. >> exactly. >> skip a night paying for the hotel. two hotel deals. >> first, hilton worldwide, 40% off on weekend stays, that's across all their brands, and the best deal of all is right here in new york you've heard of restaurant week we call the dead week. they are not calling it hotel week from january 4th to the 20th. 26 different hotels here in new york offering deals as low as $100 a night versus $500 and up from that period of time from january 4th to the 20th you cannot beat that. >> i want to travel. >> i love traveling, although thinking about the train, i was once on an overnight train in europe, it literally shu
the market at a time where demand in europe right now is relatively weak. we're seeing that supply cushion. the other thing is the market has been pricing in a lot of worst-case scenarios. obviously doesn't seem to be getting a lot worse than what is happening but definitely it has been priced in to a certain extent, phil flynn, always knowledgeable. price futures group. >> thank you. lori: 'tis the season. the little town of rudolph, ohio, trying to save christmas. melissa: striking workers in california may turn into thh grinch that stole it. the port of long beach executive director j christopher lytle will join us how this could impact your holidays. ♪ . >> i'm liz macdonald with your fox business brief. stocks are swinging between gains and losses today as investors continue to focus their attention on washington, d.c. and the fiscal cliff negotiations. u.s. banks posting their best quarterly performance in six years. according to the fdic, banks posted a combined profit of more than 37 1/2 billion dollars during the third quarter. that is the 6.6% increase from the same time last y
unexplored and unperilous territory. europe is experiencing that and the results are not attractive. it seems that when a majority of people internalize the big bang theory and ask with peggy lee is that all there is, when many people decide the universe is the result of a cosmic sneeze with no meaning, when they conclude that therefore life should be filled, overflowing with distractions, comforts and entertainments to aswage the board m, then they may become suss september bling to the excitements of politics that promise ar sets meaning and spures al vations of a human condition berefts and therefore barren. we know from bitter experience of blood soaked 20th century the political consequences of this filt meaninginglessness. political nature of who are vacuum and a vacuum of meaning is filled by sec cue lar fighting faiths. fascism gave its adherence a meaningful life. communism taught it's adherence to dwive meaning from the participation in the drama of history's unfolding destiny. the political paradox is this, secularism advanced in part as moral revotion against the history of religi
in europe and we will go back. host: in 1940, mid 1940, he is prime minister of great britain. how big at that stage is the british empire? guest: well, it covered gee graphicically about a quarter of the left-hand mass and -- land mass and population. the population was about a quarter of the earth. india, subcontinent. commonwealth and dominion, canada, new zealand, ulster, northern ireland. host: hong kong, singapore? guest: oh, yes. host: how about africa? guest: they had a relationship with egypt. i thought going into this that they sort of controlled egypt. but the treaty allowed them to go in and administer the country or safeguard the suez canal and they did that. they had in south africa jan smuts and the republic of south africa. they had some somali land, some territories there that the italians just plucked from them. they were completely unprepared everywhere for war. and i think the british army plus the australian army of five or six divisions, new zealand and the canadians, all of them put together, even if they could all get it england were outnumbered by lhitler's arm
since 1989 is the region that we used to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. it is no longer these countries no longer even have anything in common except for the common memory of >> more to pulitzer prize winner book tv is a location that the u.s. naval academy in annapolis maryland where we are interviewing some professors who are also authors. we are now joined by richard ruth, a professor here at the naval academy. professor ruth, what do you teach? >> i teach predominately sian history of why in pre-modern asian history. mostly i concentrate on thailand and vietnam. >> why is it important for students to the south asian history? >> it's very much engaged in that corner of the world we have many allies and partners that we are still working with come and many students at the naval officers southeast they are going to represent our interest there. so i think it's important for them to know south east asian history to be comfortable with someand to have
.s. that doesn't include those sophisticated geeky guys over in eastern europe in a boiler room during that. > if this is a case of neighbor-against-neighbor or family member-against-family member, what can people do to protect themselves? > > some of the stuff that we always talk about, and that is that you have to shred everything, because now you really know, your neighbors are going into your garbage and picking out stuff. so, shred everything. everything you have, no matter if it has any other identification about you besides your name and address. also, you have to guard your social security number, because that is what most of this id fraud is based on. it is really important to make sure you don't give it out to anyone, of course. give it out only to the people you need to, which is your job, your insurance company... don't give it out at a medical facility, for example. if you go to the doctor and they are asking you for it, don't give it to them. tell them your insurance company has it. because we have seen some theft come out of there as well. > that sounds like a great plan. tha
in eastern and central europe that are struggling to not only become members of the european union, but to join the north anti-ic treaty organization because they -- atlantic treaty organization because they are still seek a chance to be free from that kind of repression. i'm reminded what took place during the 2008 olympics, summer olympics, in georgia when we saw the incursion from putin's russia into georgia over the break away regions, and we continue to see lots of threats. it is a very dangerous world. very dangerous world. tragically, plato said only the dead have seen the end of war. and i remember this, we saw the demise of the soviet union, the kremlin, berlin wall, many of us did believe, and it was famously wrote about the end of history believing that political pluralism, rule of law, and self-determination, and democratic institutions would thrive all over the world. well, it hasn't quite worked out that way in the last couple of decades. and we all know what the consequences of those threats have been for the first time ever. we had the kind of attack we did on septe
? it is interesting. one of the things that has happened is what we called eastern europe is very differentiated. they no longer have much in common with one another. >> more on life and soviet east germany sunday night at 8:00 on c-span's "q&a." >> punched me, to me, take things from me. >> he is not safe on that bus. >> i have been on that bus and they are as good as gold. >> all of us were starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this phenomenon that so many of us have experienced in one way or another and have no words for, other than adolescents. finally, people are starting to stand back and say, this is not actually a normal part of growing up. this is not a normal right of passage. there was a moment where there was a possibility for change. we decided to start the film out of that feeling that voices were bubbling up. coming up to the surface to say, this is not something we can accept any more as a normal part of our culture. >> the filmmaker has followed up for award winning film by gathering essays. -- her toward women -- her award winning film by gathe
're seeing a spike in vix futures. it's indicating more volatility ahead. europe, largely taking the cues from here in the united states, and the news last evening about plan b. we are seeing a 1% loss in italy, germany is down by .9%. >> of course, futures as you saw are taking a hit on concerns that a deal will not be reached to avert that fiscal cliff. an attempt by house speaker boehner to avoid that class and pass the so-called plan b tax bill. that failed. the measure that would have kept current tax rates for those making less than $1 million a year. it never even made it to the house floor. speaker boehner is scheduled to hold a news conference about an hour from now. of course, we'll bring that to you live. >> here we are. >> here we are once again. >> there was no real plan b. there was no real possibility of this. the republicans, the vast majority signed a pledge, they will not vote for tax increase. who would think they would suddenly turn around and vote for a tax increase. they pledged not to. >> the speaker said they might. >> i don't care. >> unless it's some sort of a pl
deduction will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would argue that we should smooth into this drag even more. make policy changes so next year the gdp is half of this speed limit. that would be consistent with extending an emergency program and some form of tax holiday. in terms of the debt ceiling, that needs to be increased. it would be nice to extend it at the next presidential election. it would be nicer to get rid of it altogether. it is anachronistic law that is a problem. it creates a great deal of uncertainty. as you can see, it can do a lot of damage to the economy. there are a lot of reasons why it is being considered to eliminate that ceiling. it should be carefully considered. at the very minimum, we should push this to the other side of the election. we do not want to address the debt ceiling on a regular basis. it is damaging confidence. on fiscal sustainability, we need deficit reduction in the next 10 years of about $3 trillion. to get there, a balanced approach would be $1.4 trillion in tax revenue. half of that would come through tax reform and the
: the waft is sweeping europe and soon to be on our shores. at juniper kitchen restaurant in ontario, he creates a revolutionary eating experience. show us how it's done. >> since you said you like mint chocolate chips, we're going to do that. so just straight, raw ingredients. mint and cocoa mint, put these together, a little syrup. a little chocolate. we're going to strain all that out. let's see what happens. there's the straw. >> reporter: it's like an ice cream cloud. with endless flavor combinations, he can turn any meal into a culinary quiz show. let's see if you can trip me up. >> this one might stump you. >> cherry? >> no. >> reporter: raspberry. >> that's it. >> reporter: round two, here we go. >> classic cocktail. you almost got it. >> reporter: is this a mojito? >> yes, it is. >> reporter: and i'm cuban and it took me that long to get that one. >> our hold friend tonya rivero. i still got to chew. i don't know about you. >> i don't know if he makes a potato chip vapor. >> i'm still going for it, though. >> you can still inhale those. >> that's how charlie sheen eats. >>> this
is the region that we used to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. it's no longer -- these countries no longer have much in common with one another other than the common memory of communism occupation. >> more with pulitzer prize winner on life in sowfout east germany, poll land and from the historical narrative "iron curtain" sunday night at eight on c-span's "q&a." >> up next, four speeches with republican scott brown and north dakota democrat retiring after 20 years in the senate. last day that i serve in this great chamber, which is a month shy of three years serving i still say and believe aside from my marriage to my wife gail of 26 years and the birth of my two children ayla and arianna serving for the great people of massachusetts in the people's seat has been the greatest honor of my life. i want to thank the people of massachusetts for that opportunity to think that someone like me whose parents were married four times each, lived in 17 houses and subjected to forms of abuses growing up has the chance to serve in one of the great
are very worried that if the united states or europe imposes restrictions saying we will not allow imports from your factories unless they have the same standards as the united states, they worry these factories don't have the money to invest in the safety improvements and that these factories will lose lots of american and european orders and the factories will close and the workers with lose their jobs. i think what we need is for more companies, more western companies, western retailers like walmart or sears or disney to work closely with the bangladeshi manufacturers to make sure they have the wherewithal, the money and the will to improve fire safety, to improve the electrical systems to help make sure that there aren't more fires like the ones we so recently in bangladesh and in pakistan. >> jennifer: you talk about the big players like walmart an extremely profitable company who has subcontracted perhaps there is some willful blindness there. how much would it cost to upgrade the factories? is that something that reall
the world. the u.s. is a heavy user of credit products. europe is a distant second. it gives you a backdrop of the credit a availability. this gives you some backdrop that the markets in the united states have come back to an extent if you look at the es.ious asset class not as many people buying cars. the market is functioning. most of the student loans are going under the government's balance sheet. different loan obligations -- this data is a little bit old. $50 billion and that market is rapidly returning. this is the slide that everybody talks about, the dramatic change in how mortgage credit is made in the united states over the past six years. securitization of volumes have $300 billion in the past six years. private credit is a huge volume. $700 billion put through the private label security system. $22 billion is overstating it. of all the slides i have, this is the most telling about where the credit is coming from. it's coming to fannie and freddie and fha. 90% of loans are effectively being guaranteed by the government. it is not just a u.s. phenomenon. europe does not use a gov
and argentina and europe it is being used. the fda has approved it, and we expect it out soon. for people who can't have surgery. >> it helps with your sugar and with diabetes and weight loss. in massachusetts it is basically gi liner. it is a great treatment. >> all good topics. quick before we go, had a birthday on friday, and i got the most amazing birthday present ever. a special call from dr. dr. rosenfeld who remembered it was the 21st and called and wanted our viewers to know he sounded amazing and doing great and watching us now. thanks, doc, we love you very much. >> we miss them, of course. >> we will be right back -- no, we will be here. >> happy birthday to you. >> thank you. >> happy birthday. >>> all right, enough with the celebrating because congress is on a holiday break. the fiscal cliff deadline is still looming. hi, everybody. here we are. great to have you here. >> this is a brand-new hour of "america's news headquarters." as jaime said, lawmakers expect to return after christmas back to dc. they are thinking of getting back on thursday. that just gives them a few days to
the europe they are. in the wintertime, it was too cold to really venture out. so john quincy adams on his son had the sensational appetite for learning. on his own he studied it lame history of england, six volumes of edward gibbons, decline and fall of the roman empire. adam smith's two volume work on the wealth of nations, great economic word. he kept studying latin. he read the latin poets in cicero and avenue. he read the english poet. he had this insatiable appetite for learning. at 16 i was still studying uncle wiggly. but i read it in latin because i went to heal instead of harvard. >> i take it as a politician in our modern sense of the word female black the common touch. >> very few of the leaders of this country did at the time. they were all university graduates except for george washington and george washington was an autodidact commotion so fed 6000 books. this was an elite. constitution did not give liberty to the ordinary man. all it did was replace the king with the president. but it gave congress the same right. congress could tax. the constitution did not provide liberty
at the vatican. about 40,000 young pilgrims from all across europe attended an open air mass conducted by pope benedict. they cheered as the pope waved to the crowd from his popemobile and the crowd gathered in st. peter's square, part of a mission to promote peace. time now for the weather and over to ginger zee. >> i had to start out with pure cuteness on this one. we have to head to rhode island where they had some snow last night in some places quite a bit enemma claire is experiencing it for the first time. yes, her dad just wanted to send us a little ireport and let us know how emma -- she is very fascinated he said. she gets down, starting touching it and playing with it. many more years of snow if you're staying in rhode island. thanks for sending that. another storm to watch for. now the other one has moved off the northeast and through new england, parts of north texas and the western part of oklahoma now with some winter weather add advisories in place. it's going to dampen out as it heads to the east. quite a bit of rain from dallas and parts of the gulf eventually. so as far as ne
coming from eastern europe and has the project blitz free is being led by a mysterious russian attacker and many targeted may not even realize it. >> you're someone with a substantial amount of money in your account. you logon one day and have a smaller amount than before but you've been hacked. that could happen to thousands of americans this coming spring. a new report says some of america's biggest banks, 30 of them, are at risk of a master cyber attack that could siphon millions of dollars from unsuspecting customers. >> we've found to date 3 and 500 devices that have been infected within the u.s. pat calhoon mcafee won't name the individual bank but account holders in many of the large mainstream banks are targeted. mcafee says this attack is from a cyber gag with a handle. >> he's trying to build attackers to expand the scope of the project. so that's the first thing. but how it's actually executed in the project itself is that he has computers that are basically monitoring and controlling all of these infected devices. >> calhoon says the attackers are going after individuals who
happened since 1989 is the region that we used to call 1980 -- eastern europe has become differentiated. they have the common memory of communist occupation. >> more with pulitzer prize- winning anne applebaum. from her historical narrative "iron curtain" sun and the clock on c-span's q&a. brian monaghan says government lenders and borrowers have to reset expectations on home ownership. he spoke at a brookings institution and a vent on the future of home ownership. this is just under one hour. >> good morning. i am pleased to introduce our keynote speaker for today. he has been ceo of one of the world's largest financial institutions since 2010. bank of america serves many different audiences with a full range of financial and risk- management products and services. you see them everywhere. the bank one out of every two american households. i have gotten to know brian through my work. best help underserved americans. brian grew up the sixth of nine had a job of as bus boy and dug that made industrial magnets. he later attended brown university which is something we have in common and pl
in europe, also known as the helsinki commission, which i cochair -- which senator cardin cochairs, during senate consideration of h.r. 6156. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mr. wicker: thank you, mr. president. and, again, i come to the floor today to support this bill. it has is very important two-fold purpose. it promotes normal trade relations with russia, and at the same time the legislation insists that the russian government adhere to the rule of law. it does so by putting consequences in place for those in russia who abusive human rights, basic human rights. granting pntr to russia is a big win for americans. if congress does not act, american workers, including millions employed by small businesses, stand to lose out to foreign competitors as russia opens its market as a new member of the world trade organization. many in my home state of mississippi and around the country deserve to benefit from increased trade that this new relationship would bring. more jobs and greater economic growth are our potential rewards here in the united states. last year, mississ
volunteered to be in the ambulance service. what he did when he got to europe was rescue and pick up other dough boys in europe out of those trenches and get them behind, take them back behind american lines so that they could be taken care of their wounds and he also picked up many of our americans, 114,000 to be exact that died in the great world war i. he was allowed or was able to come back to america alive he made it through the war. although many, as i mentioned, did not. many americans when they came home from the great war over there, as cohen said, difed the new. they picked up in europe in fact many of them a great number of them depride the spanish flu, almost as many as died in europe itself. frank buckles then went to work and during his work, he went to the philippines. when he was in the philippines, the japanese invaded in world war ii. he was captured and put in a prisoner of war camp for three and a half years. he was about to be executed and the americans came and liberated the camp and he along with the other prisoners of war came back to america. frank buckles went bac
going on next year, there are a lot of countries across europe that would love a weaker currency, but may not get it under current conditions. >>> let's turn back to the latest developments in the fiscal cliff negotiations. jillian is on the set with us and you'll be here with us for the rest of the hour. we finally have movement. >> this is a cliffhanger. i think it's going to carry on for another couple days. >> that's a much better outcome. today is tuesday, isn't it? >> they don't want to spend christmas in washington, do they? >> you have thursday, friday and monday, right? >> you have a lot of aides prepared to come back after christmas to try and make sure they're not too far away from d.c. it does look encouraging. you've had movements on both sides. you've had boehner indicating that he's willing to accept and rising tax rate for the wealthiest. at the same time, you've had the president scaling back the limit to which those tax rates go up the. >> and they're not arguing about idealogical points any more. >> exactly. >> and what about the debt ceiling? do you think this
host of escalating tensions throughout the middle east. israel is feeling heat today from europe over its decision to expand settlements in the west bank and east jerusalem. at least three countries summoned israeli ambassadors to condemn the action. in egypt new protests today against president morsi and massive protests are called for tomorrow. syria bomb rebels today. secretary clinton says that country is considering using chemical weapons. >> this is a red line for the united states. i'm not going to telegraph in any specifics what we would do in the event of credible evidence. >> joining me now is former state department egypt officer joel reuben. good to have you here. let's start with that red line where syria is right now. it's estimated more than 40,000 people have been killed in this 20-month-old revolve against the government. these new reports suggesting the fresh activity at syrian chemical weapons depots. earlier this year the president singled out that threat posed by chemical weapons as a cause for greater u.s. involvement. now secretary clinton giving this warning. w
europe and asia in terms of our -- in terms of our national natural gas. but it creates a better economy, high revenues that reduces the debt. >> senator, the same question to you. i'm wondering, this headline recently predicting that we're going to be -- the united states could be producing more oil than saudi arabia beginning in 2020. i mean, this is something almost unimagined 10 years ago. what is the role of the federal government from here on out, given that? >> i think the role of the federal government is to do things that encourage exactly that result and to follow up a little bit on the question of fiscal cliff, part of the way that you saw this fiscal problem issue grow our relative position in the economy relative to everybody else's. one of our big problems right now is the percentage of government spending is way more than it should be relative to total g.d.p. and part of that is because you don't have the growth in g.d.p. that the right kind of energy policies would produce. if there's an easier formula ever in the history of economics than more american energy equals more
. the japanese markets, european countries, countries in europe which are precarious are in bigger trouble. the whole thing is going wacky, one guy is going to be standing in the middle of the storm, not grover norquist or some republican but the president of the united states who has to weather the storm and point the finger across the aisle to someone nobody else in the world knows. speaker boehner, will you solve this problem. i think times change. >> the economically the biggest risk is the sequestration. it's not the tax cuts going into effect. and -- >> you mean the millions of dollars -- >> the cuts that will be forced through in the next two years. that's a much bigger risk to the economy. >> therefore? >> therefore, if the president lets this thing -- look, the markets have already priced this in. >> i hear the opposite. i hear that they believe that grown-ups will do the job when they have to. they don't believe they're going to let us go over theically. >> i don't think the grown-ups believe they have to do the job by january 1st. i believe they believe the grown-ups have to do
the coast of georgia and battles in canada and western europe, all over the place but again the majority of battles are fought here. the really interesting thing to me is that most of the battles fought here, the big battles are lost, they are losses and the really incredible achievements, logistical achievements are migration. so that is probably the number one reason that we don't celebrate this area in full force. >> the other extraordinary thing you say is 8000 rebels were killed in action. 11,000 died in the prison ships. most of those are in new york. one ship has 7000. >> i think a total of the two prison ships that are off now the brooklyn navy yard two prison ships had something at 11,000 people that died on them. again they are not the people who you would necessarily build a giant memorial singularly. those prison ships, washington protests them all through the war. the people on the ships, they were not being fed and they were dying on the ships. if you were an officer or you had some money, but if you are neither of those things, then you died on them. the thing is, after th
to do what the rest of europe will do over time, which is accept a lower standard of living forever everybody which is why the longer-term plan is so vital, not the short-term craziness. because everybody knows he we can't keep providing americans with the current level of services unless we raise taxes in a big way on erin and cut spending somehow. even the democrats are unwilling to consider that kind of tax cut. that's why long-term spending cuts are so important. they figure into the job creation of the next 25 to 30 years, and the ability of people to stay out of poverty longer term. in the meantime, you can't get the growth needed for government receipts to go higher even in the near term. put simply, if you got someone from honeywell or eaton or celgene in the rule, explain the impact. the imperative would be to get this fiscal cliff done before vacation. hey, listen, yes, no vacation without legislation. because the longer the delay the fewer reasons to start a business and the more reasons to shrink, lay off, build fewer houses, cars, or take your business offshore if you'r
displaced because of typhoon bopha that hit the country. >> even, you know, europe has received -- because of the hardships, europeans have had their share of hardships, but they're still trying to do something they can do. >> exactly. the jobless rate in spain, don, this year topped 25%, so many people are still struggling. that being said, though, spirits will -- were lifted, and many people had a reason to line their pockets. the lottery, it's the largest lottery in spain, and it's literally translates to the big fat one, elgordo, and spain paid out $2.2 billion to thousands of winners, and you have young children who read out the numbers, which we saw on the video before, and it's really - read out the numbers and it lifts a lot of spirits especially in a time where they have been hit with economic hardship. >> maybe that would help. >> winning the lottery. >> i watched "miracle on 34th street" except i don't like the colorized version. i like the black and white. bah humbug. don scrooge. sorry. maybe when dsanta comes i'll fel better. >>> a year ago he blew out a knee and his career w
and played a key role in the space race. but in recent years, japan, europe and the uk have all ended the practice, leaving the u.s. and gabon the only two nations that allow scientists to conduct tests on chimpanzees, but maybe not for long. >> if this committee had been tasked to do what it was asked to do five years from now, we probably would have said there is no longer any need for the use of chimpanzees. >> reporter: jeffrey kahn is a professor of bioethics at johns hopkins university. he chaired a blue ribbon committee for the institute of medicine that took a hard look chimpanzee testing in the u.s. as the outcry from animal rights activists reached a crescendo. >> we did acknowledge that from the perspective of this committee, the fact that chimpanzees are very close to humans gives them a different status. >> reporter: in late 2011, the committee laid out strict guidelines for chimp testing: the research must be done only when it's lifesaving, it can't be done ethically in humans, there are no other models, and the animals are socially and humanely housed. when the report a
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